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Ohio Personal Injury Law Blog

Could medication monitoring have prevented medical mistake?

A woman was watching television with her husband and started to experience trouble breathing. He took his wife to the hospital to find out what was wrong and get treatment. She died a few hours later from an overdose of fentanyl, a powerful pain medication. She was one of 25 suspicious deaths at an Ohio hospital, and all 25 of the patients were under the care of the same doctor. Were their deaths the result of a medical mistake?

The case concerns the amount of medication prescribed by the doctor as well as the hospital's control of the medication itself. According to the podcast accompanyng the article, the hospital makes use of an automatic dispensing machine to fill medication orders from the doctors. Nurses and pharmacists taking medication from the machine had the ability to override high dosage warnings and dosage limits. In addition, it does not appear that careful monitoring of inventory was in place. It is believed that awareness of the decline in inventory may have called attention to a possible issue.

Medical malpractice may have hastened patient deaths

When a loved becomes ill and needs to go to the hospital for care, one typically trusts that the medical staff at the hospital will do their best to deliver the highest level of care possible. At an Ohio hospital where 25 people recently died, that does not appear to have been the case. A doctor who has been charged with murder may be guilty of medical malpractice.

The patients were found to have received lethal doses of pain medication after an investigation into the suspicious deaths of several patients at the hospital. In addition to the doctor who has come under suspicion, 23 additional employees were let go due to their possible involvement in the patient deaths. The employees let go included nurses, doctors and pharmacy staff. In addition, the CEO announced his resignation.

Quality of prenatal care can lead to medical malpractice case

A child's birth is one of the most eagerly anticipated events in a woman's life in Ohio. Everyone hopes for the birth of a healthy baby and entrusts their care to the medical community in the expectation that they will do everything possible to deliver a healthy child. In a recent trial in another state, the jury awarded a mother a substantial sum in her medical malpractice lawsuit.

The woman went to the hospital complaining of discomfort and not feeling well. She was 25 weeks pregnant and was diagnosed as suffering from preeclampsia, a condition resulting in high blood pressure that can be very dangerous to both the mother and the baby. She was informed of her diagnosis but may not have understood the severity of her condition. In lieu of a cesarean section, labor was induced and the baby girl was born two days later. She weighed less than 2 pounds and had suffered severe brain damage.

Drunk driving accident can mar holiday celebrations

Midsummer is here and with it the sad and tragic increase in the number of highway fatalities in Ohio. A recent crash on I-70 in Ohio took the life of one person, and two others required hospitalization for their injuries. Alcohol is believed to be involved in what appears to be a drunk driving accident.

A man was driving a BMW sports car eastbound on the highway at about 2:30 a.m.. The vehicle reportedly clipped an SUV and sent the SUV careening to the right side of the highway. The SUV apparently hit an exit sign and a light pole before rolling and coming to a stop on its left side. The BMW continued driving until it became disabled a short distance away. It is believed that alcohol contributed to the cause of the crash, and speed may also have been a factor.

Medical malpractice: New hospital sued over water supply

Hospitals are typically where sick or injured people go to get well. As such, one would certainly expect a certain standard of cleanliness and freedom from bacteria, particularly in a newly opened facility in Ohio. There have been two lawsuits filed against Mount Carmel Grove City, a hospital that opened for patient care in April of this year. The most recent suit stems from a visitor to the hospital contracting a disease that is believed to have been spread through the water system. The presence of a dangerous bacteria in the water supply could be a contributing factor in a medical malpractice lawsuit and could also be grounds for a premises liability claim.

A woman visited a patient in the hospital in May of this year. She was later diagnosed as having contracted the Legionella bacteria, and it is believed she came in contact with the bacteria while visiting the hospital. The bacteria is not spread by casual contact and the hospital's hot water system is believed to be the source. 

Failure to disclose test results ends in medical malpractice suit

The anticipation of the birth of a new baby can be one of the happiest times in a woman's life in Ohio. If a woman is in her 30s or older, concern for the health of the unborn baby may prompt her to undergo certain tests to help determine the health of the fetus. Failure to accurately disclose the results of such tests resulted in a medical malpractice case in another state.

A woman who had a four-year-old son with Down syndrome had an ultrasound to check on the health of the child she was carrying. The test revealed the presence of a foot deformity known as a sandal gap. The deformity, a larger-than-normal gap between the big toe and the second toe, is sometimes seen in babies with Down syndrome.

Legionnaires' kills 1, sickens others at Mount Carmel Grove City

Mount Carmel Grove City hospital has reported an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease with at least 14 confirmed cases, including one death. The $361-million facility opened on April 28, and the first case of Legionnaires' was reported on April 29. This could indicate a serious problem with the facility's water system or maintenance practices.

Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia that is caused by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria, which typically enters the system through inhalation. Legionnaires' is generally not transmitted by person-to-person contact. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Legionnaires' disease is commonly associated with buildings with complex water systems where the bacteria can spread.

Failed back surgery results in a medical malpractice lawsuit

Thousands of people in Ohio are plagued by back pain. Open a magazine, watch TV and one may get the impression it's one of the foremost health issues in the country, and it is. The population is aging and body parts are not immune. Back pain is one of the most common complaints among those who are middle-aged or elderly. There are many types of surgeries that strive to relieve back pain, and one such surgery in another state failed and resulted in a medical malpractice lawsuit.

A 42-year-old woman suffered from numbness and pain in her lower back. Doctors performed a laminectomy, also known as spinal decompression. Complications resulting from the surgery left her mostly paralyzed from the chest down. It is believed that the complications were caused by a failure to remove a gelfoam dressing used during the surgery as well as an absence of drains to drain off excess fluid from the surgical area.

Football helmet is possibly a defective product

Football is a dangerous sport. Players wear a significant amount of padding and specially designed helmets in an effort to protect themselves from serious injury. In Ohio and elsewhere, it remains a very popular sport with young men beginning at a very young age. Even with the protection, injuries can still occur. One such injury, that may have contributed to the death of a 22-year-old man, has resulted in a products liability case involving a potentially defective product.

The young man had played football from the age of 8 and played through high school. He played his last game at the age of 18. The man's family were not unaware of the dangers of their son playing football but had spoken with members of the medical community and felt that the safety equipment used provided sufficient protection.

Ohio Family Dies Due To Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

A recent tragedy occurred in Geona Township, Ohio when four members of the Reitter family died after a faulty water heater released carbon monoxide into their home.

According to local investigators, the water heater was similar to a model that was part of a recent product recall by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission.

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